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The CO2 record at the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory: a new opportunity to study processes on seasonal and inter-annual scales

Botia, Santiago and Komiya, Shujiro and Marshall, Julia and Koch, Thomas and Gałkowski, Michał and Lavric, Jost and Gomes‐Alves, Eliane and Walter, David and Fisch, Gilberto and Pinho, Davieliton M. and Nelson, BruceW. and Martins, Giordane and Luijkx, Ingrid T. and Koren, Gerbrand and Florentie, Liesbeth and de Araujo, Alessandro Carioca and Sa, Marta and Andreae, Meinrat O. and Heimann, Martin and Peters, Wouter and Gerbig, Christoph (2021) The CO2 record at the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory: a new opportunity to study processes on seasonal and inter-annual scales. Global Change Biology. Wiley. doi: 10.1111/gcb.15905. ISSN 1354-1013.

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15905

Abstract

High quality atmospheric CO2 measurements are sparse in Amazonia, but can provide critical insights into the spatial and temporal variability of sources and sinks of CO2. In this study we present the first six years (2014-2019) of continuous, high-precision measurements of atmospheric CO2 at the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO, 2.1 degrees S, 58.9 degrees W). After subtracting the simulated background concentrations from our observational record, we define a CO2 regional signal (Delta-CO2obs) that has a marked seasonal cycle with an amplitude of about 4 ppm. At both seasonal and inter-annual scales we find differences in phase between Delta-CO2obs and the local eddy covariance net ecosystem exchange (EC-NEE), which is interpreted as an indicator of a decoupling between local and non-local drivers of Delta-CO2obs. In addition, we present how the 2015/2016 El Nino-induced drought was captured by our atmospheric record as a positive two-standard-deviation anomaly in both the wet and dry season of 2016. Furthermore, we analyzed the observed seasonal cycle and inter-annual variability of CO2obs together with net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using a suite of modeled flux products representing biospheric and aquatic CO2 exchange. We use both non-optimized and optimized (i.e., resulting from atmospheric inverse modeling) NEE fluxes as input in an atmospheric transport model (STILT). The observed shape and amplitude of the seasonal cycle was captured neither by the simulations using the optimized fluxes nor by those using the diagnostic Vegetation and Photosynthesis Respiration Model (VPRM).We show that including the contribution of CO2 from river evasion improves the simulated shape (not the magnitude) of the seasonal cycle when using a data-driven non-optimized NEE product (FLUXCOM). The simulated contribution from river evasion was found to be 25% of the seasonal cycle amplitude. Our study demonstrates the importance of the ATTO record to better understand the Amazon carbon cycle at various spatial and temporal scales.

Item URL in elib:https://elib.dlr.de/144198/
Document Type:Article
Title:The CO2 record at the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory: a new opportunity to study processes on seasonal and inter-annual scales
Authors:
AuthorsInstitution or Email of AuthorsAuthor's ORCID iD
Botia, SantiagoBiogeochemical Signals Department, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, 07745 Jena, GermanyUNSPECIFIED
Komiya, ShujiroBiogeochemical Processes Department, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, 07745 Jena, GermanyUNSPECIFIED
Marshall, JuliaDLR, IPAhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-2648-128X
Koch, ThomasBiogeochemical Signals Department, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, 07745 Jena, Germany Search for moreUNSPECIFIED
Gałkowski, MichałBiogeochemical Signals Department, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, 07745 Jena, Germany; Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, PolandUNSPECIFIED
Lavric, JostBiogeochemical Processes Department, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, 07745 Jena, GermanyUNSPECIFIED
Gomes‐Alves, ElianeBiogeochemical Processes Department, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, 07745 Jena, GermanyUNSPECIFIED
Walter, DavidMultiphase Chemistry Department, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, 55128 Mainz, GermanyUNSPECIFIED
Fisch, GilbertoInstituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial (DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, BrazilUNSPECIFIED
Pinho, Davieliton M.Environmental Dynamics Department, Brazil’s National Institute for Amazon Research – INPA, Av. Andre Araujo, 2936 Manaus, BrazilUNSPECIFIED
Nelson, BruceW.Environmental Dynamics Department, Brazil’s National Institute for Amazon Research – INPA, Av. Andre Araujo, 2936 Manaus, BrazilUNSPECIFIED
Martins, GiordaneEnvironmental Dynamics Department, Brazil’s National Institute for Amazon Research – INPA, Av. Andre Araujo, 2936 Manaus, BrazilUNSPECIFIED
Luijkx, Ingrid T.Meteorology and Air Quality Department, Wageningen University and Research Center, 6708PB Wageningen, The NetherlandsUNSPECIFIED
Koren, GerbrandMeteorology and Air Quality Department, Wageningen University and Research Center, 6708PB Wageningen, The NetherlandsUNSPECIFIED
Florentie, LiesbethMeteorology and Air Quality Department, Wageningen University and Research Center, 6708PB Wageningen, The NetherlandsUNSPECIFIED
de Araujo, Alessandro CariocaEmpresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria (EMBRAPA), Trav. Dr. Eneas Pinheiro, Belem, PA, BrazilUNSPECIFIED
Sa, MartaInstituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Av. Andre Araujo 2936, Manaus, AM, BrazilUNSPECIFIED
Andreae, Meinrat O.Biogeochemistry Department, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, 55128 Mainz, Germany; Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093 USAUNSPECIFIED
Heimann, MartinBiogeochemical Signals Department, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, 07745 Jena, Germany; Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research (INAR) / Physics, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, FinlandUNSPECIFIED
Peters, WouterMeteorology and Air Quality Department, Wageningen University and Research Center, 6708PB Wageningen, The Netherlands; Groningen University, Energy and Sustainability Research Institute Groningen, 9747 AG Groningen, The NetherlandsUNSPECIFIED
Gerbig, ChristophBiogeochemical Signals Department, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, 07745 Jena, GermanyUNSPECIFIED
Date:25 September 2021
Journal or Publication Title:Global Change Biology
Refereed publication:Yes
Open Access:Yes
Gold Open Access:No
In SCOPUS:Yes
In ISI Web of Science:Yes
DOI :10.1111/gcb.15905
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:1354-1013
Status:Accepted
Keywords:ATTO, Amazon, CO2, seasonal cycle, net ecosystem exchange, river evasion
HGF - Research field:Aeronautics, Space and Transport
HGF - Program:Space
HGF - Program Themes:Earth Observation
DLR - Research area:Raumfahrt
DLR - Program:R EO - Earth Observation
DLR - Research theme (Project):R - Atmospheric and climate research
Location: Oberpfaffenhofen
Institutes and Institutions:Institute of Atmospheric Physics
Deposited By: Marshall, Julia
Deposited On:05 Oct 2021 11:27
Last Modified:08 Oct 2021 13:00

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