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The impact of nocturnal road traffic noise, bedroom window orientation, and work-related stress on subjective sleep quality – Results of a cross-sectional study among working women

Bartels, S. and Ögren, M. and Kim, J.-L. and Fredriksson, S. and Persson Waye, K. (2021) The impact of nocturnal road traffic noise, bedroom window orientation, and work-related stress on subjective sleep quality – Results of a cross-sectional study among working women. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 94, pp. 1523-1536. Springer. doi: 10.1007/s00420-021-01696-w. ISSN 0340-0131.

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Official URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00420-021-01696-w

Abstract

Objective: To examine the effect of work-related stress and road noise exposure on self-rated sleep and potential additive interaction effects. Methods: Sleep and predictor variables were surveyed within two subsamples with 2,191 and 1,764 working women in a cross-sectional study. Sleep was assessed using a single question on general sleep quality and four questions on specific sleep problems and subsequently dichotomized (poor sleep vs. no poor sleep). Work–related stress was operationalized by job strain and effort-reward imbalance. Nocturnal exposure to road traffic noise was assessed as a) the orientation of the bedroom window to a quiet façade vs. a low-, medium- or high-trafficked street and b) energy-equivalent sound pressure levels for night-time modelled at the most exposed façade (Lnight). We distinguished between low (<45 dB(A)), medium (45 - 50 dB(A)) and high exposure (> 50 dB(A)). Results: Poor sleep was associated with job strain and effort-reward imbalance. The prevalence of poor sleep did not increase with increasing Lnight, but bedroom window orientation showed a non-significant trend. A quiet façade had a protective effect on sleep in each Lnight category. We found a non-significant trend for an additive interaction between bedroom window orientation and job strain. Conclusions: Noise levels modelled for the most exposed façade likely overestimate the actual exposure and thus may not be a precise predictor of poor sleep. Bedroom window orientation seems more relevant. Potential additive interaction effects between bedroom window orientation and job strain should be considered when interpreting epidemiological study results on noise-induced sleep disturbances.

Item URL in elib:https://elib.dlr.de/142298/
Document Type:Article
Title:The impact of nocturnal road traffic noise, bedroom window orientation, and work-related stress on subjective sleep quality – Results of a cross-sectional study among working women
Authors:
AuthorsInstitution or Email of AuthorsAuthor's ORCID iD
Bartels, S.susanne.bartels (at) dlr.deUNSPECIFIED
Ögren, M.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kim, J.-L.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Fredriksson, S.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Persson Waye, K.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date:27 May 2021
Journal or Publication Title:International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Refereed publication:Yes
Open Access:Yes
Gold Open Access:No
In SCOPUS:Yes
In ISI Web of Science:Yes
Volume:94
DOI :10.1007/s00420-021-01696-w
Page Range:pp. 1523-1536
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0340-0131
Status:Published
Keywords:poor sleep, road traffic noise, work stress, additive interaction, quiet façade
HGF - Research field:Aeronautics, Space and Transport
HGF - Program:Transport
HGF - Program Themes:other
DLR - Research area:Transport
DLR - Program:V - no assignment
DLR - Research theme (Project):V - no assignment
Location: Köln-Porz
Institutes and Institutions:Institute of Aerospace Medicine > Sleep and Human Factors Research
Deposited By: Sender, Alina
Deposited On:02 Jun 2021 13:31
Last Modified:24 Aug 2021 12:00

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