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Adverse interaction effects of chronic and acute sleep deficits on spatial working memory but not on verbal working memory or declarative memory

Hennecke, E. and Lange, D. and Steenbergen, F. and Fronczek-Poncelet, J. and Elmenhorst, D. and Bauer, A. and Aeschbach, D. and Elmenhorst, E.-M. (2020) Adverse interaction effects of chronic and acute sleep deficits on spatial working memory but not on verbal working memory or declarative memory. Journal of Sleep Research, Online ahead of print, e13225. Wiley. doi: 10.1111/jsr.13225. ISSN 0962-1105.

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Official URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jsr.13225

Abstract

The accumulation of chronic sleep deficits combined with acute sleep loss is common in shift workers and increases the risk of errors and accidents. We investigated single and combined effects of chronic and acute sleep loss and recovery sleep on working memory performance (N‐back task) and on overnight declarative memory recall (paired‐associate lists) in 36 healthy participants. After baseline measurements, the chronic sleep restriction group (n = 21; mean [SD] age 26 [4] years) underwent 5 nights of sleep restriction (5‐hr time in bed [TIB]), whereas the control group (n = 15; mean [SD] age 28 [6] years) had 8‐hr TIB during those nights. Afterwards, both groups spent 1 night with 8‐hr TIB prior to acute sleep deprivation for 38 hr, and a final recovery night (10‐hr TIB). Chronic sleep restriction decreased spatial N‐back performance compared to baseline (omissions: p = .001; sensitivity: p = .012), but not letter N‐back performance or word‐pair recall. Acute sleep deprivation impaired spatial N‐back performance more in the chronic sleep restriction group than in the control group (interaction between group and time awake: p ≤ .02). No group differences during acute sleep loss appeared in letter N‐back performance or word recall. It is concluded that chronic sleep loss, even when followed by a night of recovery sleep, increases the vulnerability to impairments in spatial working memory during subsequent acute sleep loss. Verbal working memory and declarative memory were not affected by restricted sleep.

Item URL in elib:https://elib.dlr.de/137649/
Document Type:Article
Additional Information:Online Version of Record before inclusion in an issue, e13225
Title:Adverse interaction effects of chronic and acute sleep deficits on spatial working memory but not on verbal working memory or declarative memory
Authors:
AuthorsInstitution or Email of AuthorsAuthor's ORCID iD
Hennecke, E.Eva.Hennecke (at) dlr.deUNSPECIFIED
Lange, D.denise.lange (at) dlr.deUNSPECIFIED
Steenbergen, F.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Fronczek-Poncelet, J.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Elmenhorst, D.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bauer, A.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Aeschbach, D.daniel.aeschbach (at) dlr.deUNSPECIFIED
Elmenhorst, E.-M.Eva-maria.elmenhorst (at) dlr.deUNSPECIFIED
Date:7 October 2020
Journal or Publication Title:Journal of Sleep Research
Refereed publication:Yes
Open Access:Yes
Gold Open Access:No
In SCOPUS:Yes
In ISI Web of Science:Yes
DOI :10.1111/jsr.13225
Page Range:Online ahead of print, e13225
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0962-1105
Status:Published
Keywords:cognition, polysomnography, sleep deprivation
HGF - Research field:Aeronautics, Space and Transport
HGF - Program:Aeronautics
HGF - Program Themes:air traffic management and operations
DLR - Research area:Aeronautics
DLR - Program:L AO - Air Traffic Management and Operation
DLR - Research theme (Project):L - Human factors and safety in Aeronautics (old)
Location: Köln-Porz
Institutes and Institutions:Institute of Aerospace Medicine > Sleep and Human Factors Research
Deposited By: Sender, Alina
Deposited On:19 Nov 2020 13:52
Last Modified:11 May 2021 11:18

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