elib
DLR-Header
DLR-Logo -> http://www.dlr.de
DLR Portal Home | Imprint | Privacy Policy | Contact | Deutsch
Fontsize: [-] Text [+]

Effect of novel short-arm human centrifugation-induced gravitational gradients upon cardiovascular responses, cerebral perfusion and g-tolerance

Laing, C. and Green, D.A. and Mulder, E. and Hinghofer-Szalkay, H. and Blaber, A.P. and Rittweger, J. and Goswami, N. (2020) Effect of novel short-arm human centrifugation-induced gravitational gradients upon cardiovascular responses, cerebral perfusion and g-tolerance. The Journal of Physiology, 598 (19), pp. 4237-4249. Wiley. doi: 10.1113/JP273615. ISSN 0022-3751.

[img] PDF - Published version
1MB

Official URL: https://physoc.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1113/JP273615

Abstract

Artificial gravity (AG) through short-arm human centrifugation (SAHC) has been proposed as a holisticspaceflight countermeasure.Movement of the rotational axis position (RAP) from above the head towards the heart may reduce central hypovolaemia, aid cerebral perfusion, and thus promote g-tolerance. This study determined the effect of RAP upon cardiovascular responses, peripheral blood displacement (i.e. central hypovolaemia), cerebral perfusion and g-tolerance, and their inter-relationships. Twenty (10 male) healthy participants (26.2 ± 4.0 years) underwent nine (following a familiarization run) randomized 10 min passive SAHC runs with RAP set above the head (P1), at the apex of the head (P2), or at heart level (P3) with foot-level Gz at 1.0 g, 1.7 g and 2.4 g. Cerebral tissue saturation index (cTSI, cerebral perfusion surrogate), calf circumference (CC, central hypovolaemia), heart rate (HR) and digital heart-level mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were continuously recorded, in addition to incidence of pre-syncopal symptoms (PSS). CC and HR increases were attenuated from P1 to P3 (CC: 5.46 ± 0.54 mm to 2.23±0.42 mm; HR: 50±4 bpm to 8±2 bpm, P < 0.05).In addition, cTSI decrements were also attenuated (cTSI: −2.85 ± 0.48% to −0.95 ± 0.34%, P < 0.05) and PSS incidence lower in P3 than P1 (P < 0.05). A positive linear relationship was observed between CC and HR with increasing +Gz, and a negative relationship between CC and cTSI, both independent of RAP. Our data suggest that movement of RAP towards the heart (reduced g-gradient), independent of foot-level Gz, leads to improved g-tolerance. Further investigations are required to assess the effect of differential baroreceptor feedback (i.e. aortic–carotid g-gradient).

Item URL in elib:https://elib.dlr.de/137103/
Document Type:Article
Title:Effect of novel short-arm human centrifugation-induced gravitational gradients upon cardiovascular responses, cerebral perfusion and g-tolerance
Authors:
AuthorsInstitution or Email of AuthorsAuthor's ORCID iD
Laing, C.King’s College LondonUNSPECIFIED
Green, D.A.Centre of Human and Aerospace Physiological Sciences, King’s College London, London SE11UL, UKUNSPECIFIED
Mulder, E.german aerospace center (dlr), institute of aerospace medicine, biomedical science support center, cologne, germanyUNSPECIFIED
Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.Gravitational Physiology and Medicine research unit, Institute of Physiology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.UNSPECIFIED
Blaber, A.P.Department of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, CanadaUNSPECIFIED
Rittweger, J.Joern.Rittweger (at) dlr.dehttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-2223-8963
Goswami, N.Gravitational Physiology and Medicine research unit, Institute of Physiology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.UNSPECIFIED
Date:July 2020
Journal or Publication Title:The Journal of Physiology
Refereed publication:Yes
Open Access:Yes
Gold Open Access:No
In SCOPUS:Yes
In ISI Web of Science:Yes
Volume:598
DOI :10.1113/JP273615
Page Range:pp. 4237-4249
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0022-3751
Status:Published
Keywords:short-arm human centrifugation, cerebral perfusion, gravitational gradients, g-tolerance
HGF - Research field:Aeronautics, Space and Transport
HGF - Program:Space
HGF - Program Themes:Research under Space Conditions
DLR - Research area:Raumfahrt
DLR - Program:R FR - Research under Space Conditions
DLR - Research theme (Project):R - Vorhaben Systemphysiologie (old)
Location: Köln-Porz
Institutes and Institutions:Institute of Aerospace Medicine > Muscle and Bone Metabolism
Institute of Aerospace Medicine > Leitungsbereich ME
Deposited By: Arndt, Carina
Deposited On:05 Nov 2020 17:05
Last Modified:05 Nov 2020 17:05

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Browse
Search
Help & Contact
Information
electronic library is running on EPrints 3.3.12
Copyright © 2008-2017 German Aerospace Center (DLR). All rights reserved.