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The Impact of 6 and 12 Months in Space on Human Brain Structure and Intracranial Fluid Shifts

Hupfeld, Kathleen E. and McGregor, Heather R. and Lee, Jessica K. and Beltran, Nichole E. and Korman, Igor S. and De Dios, Yiri E. and Reuter-Lorenz, Patti A. and Riascos, Roy F. and Pasternak, Ofer and Wood, Scott J. and Bloomberg, Jacob and Mulavara, Ajitkumar P. and Seidler, Rachael D. (2020) The Impact of 6 and 12 Months in Space on Human Brain Structure and Intracranial Fluid Shifts. Cerebral Cortex Communications, 1 (1), tgaa023. Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/texcom/tgaa023. ISSN 2632-7376.

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Official URL: https://academic.oup.com/cercorcomms/article/1/1/tgaa023/5857115

Abstract

As plans develop for Mars missions, it is important to understand how long-duration spaceflight impacts brain health. Here we report how 12-month (n = 2 astronauts) versus 6-month (n = 10 astronauts) missions impact brain structure and fluid shifts. We collected MRI scans once before flight and four times after flight. Astronauts served as their own controls; we evaluated pre- to postflight changes and return toward preflight levels across the 4 postflight points. We also provide data to illustrate typical brain changes over 7 years in a reference dataset. Twelve months in space generally resulted in larger changes across multiple brain areas compared with 6-month missions and aging, particularly for fluid shifts. The majority of changes returned to preflight levels by 6 months after flight. Ventricular volume substantially increased for 1 of the 12-month astronauts (left: +25%, right: +23%) and the 6-month astronauts (left: 17 ± 12%, right: 24 ± 6%) and exhibited little recovery at 6 months. Several changes correlated with past flight experience; those with less time between subsequent missions had larger preflight ventricles and smaller ventricular volume increases with flight. This suggests that spaceflight-induced ventricular changes may endure for long periods after flight. These results provide insight into brain changes that occur with longduration spaceflight and demonstrate the need for closer study of fluid shifts

Item URL in elib:https://elib.dlr.de/135965/
Document Type:Article
Title:The Impact of 6 and 12 Months in Space on Human Brain Structure and Intracranial Fluid Shifts
Authors:
AuthorsInstitution or Email of AuthorsAuthor's ORCID iD
Hupfeld, Kathleen E.Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32608, USAhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-5086-4841
McGregor, Heather R.Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32608, USAUNSPECIFIED
Lee, Jessica K.German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt), 51147 Cologne, GermanyUNSPECIFIED
Beltran, Nichole E.KBR, Houston, TX 77002, USAUNSPECIFIED
Korman, Igor S.KBR, Houston, TX 77002, USAUNSPECIFIED
De Dios, Yiri E.KBR, Houston, TX 77002, USAUNSPECIFIED
Reuter-Lorenz, Patti A.Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USAUNSPECIFIED
Riascos, Roy F.Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USAUNSPECIFIED
Pasternak, OferDepartments of Psychology and Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USAUNSPECIFIED
Wood, Scott J.Neuroscience Laboratory, Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058, USAUNSPECIFIED
Bloomberg, JacobNASA, Johnson Space CenterUNSPECIFIED
Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.KBR, Houston, TX 77002, USAUNSPECIFIED
Seidler, Rachael D.Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32608, USAUNSPECIFIED
Date:15 June 2020
Journal or Publication Title:Cerebral Cortex Communications
Refereed publication:Yes
Open Access:Yes
Gold Open Access:Yes
In SCOPUS:No
In ISI Web of Science:No
Volume:1
DOI :10.1093/texcom/tgaa023
Page Range:tgaa023
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:2632-7376
Status:Published
Keywords:cortical thickness, free water, gray matter volume, spaceflight, ventricular volume
HGF - Research field:Aeronautics, Space and Transport
HGF - Program:Space
HGF - Program Themes:Research under Space Conditions
DLR - Research area:Raumfahrt
DLR - Program:R FR - Research under Space Conditions
DLR - Research theme (Project):R - Vorhaben Systemphysiologie (old)
Location: Köln-Porz
Institutes and Institutions:Institute of Aerospace Medicine > Muscle and Bone Metabolism
Deposited By: Arndt, Carina
Deposited On:08 Sep 2020 13:12
Last Modified:19 Dec 2020 04:12

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