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Growth on Carbohydrates from Carbonaceous Meteorites Alters the Immunogenicity of Environment-Derived Bacterial Pathogens

Domínguez-Andrés, Jorge and Eleveld, Marc and Renieris, Georgios and Boltje, Thomas J. and Mesman, Rob J. and van Niftrik, Laura and Moons, Sam J. and Rettberg, Petra and van der Meer, Jos W.M. and Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J. and Op den Camp, Huub J.M. and de Jonge, Marien I. and Netea, Mihai G. (2020) Growth on Carbohydrates from Carbonaceous Meteorites Alters the Immunogenicity of Environment-Derived Bacterial Pathogens. Astrobiology, 20 (11), pp. 1353-1362. Mary Ann Liebert Inc.. doi: 10.1089/ast.2019.2173. ISSN 1531-1074.

Full text not available from this repository.

Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ast.2019.2173

Abstract

The last decade has witnessed a renewed interest in space exploration. Public and private institutions are investing considerable effort toward the direct exploration of the Moon and Mars, as well as more distant bodies in the solar system. Both automated and human-crewed spacecraft are being considered in these efforts. As inevitable fellow travelers on the bodies of astronauts, spaceships, or equipment, terrestrial microorganisms will undoubtedly come into contact with extraterrestrial environments, despite stringent decontamination. These microorganisms could eventually adapt and grow in their new habitats, where they might potentially recolonize and lead to the infection of the human space travelers. In this article, we demonstrate that clinically relevant bacterial species found in the environment are able to grow in minimal media with sugar compounds identified in extraterrestrial carbon sources. As a surrogate model, we used carbohydrates previously isolated from carbonaceous meteorites. The bacteria underwent an adaptation process that caused structural modifications in the cell envelope that sparked changes in pathogenic potential, both in vitro and in vivo. Understanding the adaptation of microorganisms exposed to extraterrestrial environments, with subsequent changes in their immunogenicity and virulence, requires a comprehensive analysis of such scenarios to ensure the safety of major space expeditions in the decades to come.

Item URL in elib:https://elib.dlr.de/135151/
Document Type:Article
Title:Growth on Carbohydrates from Carbonaceous Meteorites Alters the Immunogenicity of Environment-Derived Bacterial Pathogens
Authors:
AuthorsInstitution or Email of AuthorsAuthor's ORCID iD
Domínguez-Andrés, JorgeDepartment of Internal Medicine and Radboud Center for Infectious Diseasesand Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands.UNSPECIFIED
Eleveld, MarcRadboud Center for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands and Section Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen.UNSPECIFIED
Renieris, Georgios4th Department of Internal Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, Athens, Greece.UNSPECIFIED
Boltje, Thomas J.Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.UNSPECIFIED
Mesman, Rob J.Department of Microbiology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Faculty of Science, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.UNSPECIFIED
van Niftrik, LauraDepartment of Microbiology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Faculty of Science, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.UNSPECIFIED
Moons, Sam J.Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.UNSPECIFIED
Rettberg, PetraRadiation Biology Department, Institute of Aerospace Medicine, German Aerospace Center (DLR), 51147 Cologne, Germany; Petra.Rettberg (at) dlr.dehttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-4439-2395
van der Meer, Jos W.M.Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands and Radboud Center for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands.UNSPECIFIED
Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.4th Department of Internal Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, Athens, Greece.UNSPECIFIED
Op den Camp, Huub J.M.Department of Microbiology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Faculty of Science, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.UNSPECIFIED
de Jonge, Marien I.Radboud Center for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands and 4th Department of Internal Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, Athens, Greece.UNSPECIFIED
Netea, Mihai G.Department of Internal Medicine and Radboud Center for Infectious Diseasesand Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands and University of Bonn, Germany.UNSPECIFIED
Date:8 May 2020
Journal or Publication Title:Astrobiology
Refereed publication:Yes
Open Access:No
Gold Open Access:No
In SCOPUS:Yes
In ISI Web of Science:Yes
Volume:20
DOI :10.1089/ast.2019.2173
Page Range:pp. 1353-1362
Publisher:Mary Ann Liebert Inc.
ISSN:1531-1074
Status:Published
Keywords:Space Exploration, Microorganisms, Immunity, Cytokines, Meteorites, Bacteria
HGF - Research field:Aeronautics, Space and Transport
HGF - Program:Space
HGF - Program Themes:Research under Space Conditions
DLR - Research area:Raumfahrt
DLR - Program:R FR - Research under Space Conditions
DLR - Research theme (Project):R - Vorhaben Strahlenbiologie (old)
Location: Köln-Porz
Institutes and Institutions:Institute of Aerospace Medicine > Radiation Biology
Deposited By: Kopp, Kerstin
Deposited On:08 Jun 2020 10:48
Last Modified:20 Apr 2021 13:13

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