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Young adults are more vulnerable to chronic sleep defciency and recurrent circadian disruption than older adults

Zitting, Kirsi-Marja and Münch, Mirjam Y. and Cain, Sean W. and Wang, Wei and Wong, Arick and Ronda, Joseph M. and Aeschbach, Daniel and Czeisler, Charles A. and Duffy, Jeanne F. (2018) Young adults are more vulnerable to chronic sleep defciency and recurrent circadian disruption than older adults. Scientific Reports. Nature Publishing Group. DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-29358-x ISSN 2045-2322

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Official URL: http://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-29358-x

Abstract

More than a third of US adults report fewer than 6 hours of sleep a night, making chronic sleep restriction a growing public health concern. Sleep curtailment is associated with an increase in industrial accidents, motor vehicle accidents, medical and other occupational errors. Young adults are more vulnerable to acute sleep deprivation than older adults, but less is known about how young vs. older adults respond to the more commonly experienced chronic sleep restriction. To test the hypothesis that young adults are more vulnerable to chronic sleep loss than older adults, we compared data from young and older adults who underwent three weeks of chronic sleep restriction (equivalent to 5.6 hours/24 hours) combined with recurrent circadian disruption in an experiment that enabled us to separate the infuences of the sleep-wake homeostatic process, the circadian timing system, and the chronic sleep defcit. We found that while young and older adults reported similar levels of subjective sleepiness, objective measures of sleepiness revealed that young adults were more vulnerable and had more attentional failures than the older adults. These results have important public health implications, particularly related to prevention of sleep-related motor vehicle crashes in young drivers. Further research is needed to understand the neurobiological basis of these age-related diferences.

Item URL in elib:https://elib.dlr.de/122162/
Document Type:Article
Title:Young adults are more vulnerable to chronic sleep defciency and recurrent circadian disruption than older adults
Authors:
AuthorsInstitution or Email of AuthorsAuthors ORCID iD
Zitting, Kirsi-MarjaUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Münch, Mirjam Y.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cain, Sean W.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wang, WeiWei.Wang (at) dlr.deUNSPECIFIED
Wong, ArickUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Ronda, Joseph M.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Aeschbach, DanielDaniel.Aeschbach (at) dlr.deUNSPECIFIED
Czeisler, Charles A.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Duffy, Jeanne F.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date:23 July 2018
Journal or Publication Title:Scientific Reports
Refereed publication:Yes
Open Access:Yes
Gold Open Access:Yes
In SCOPUS:Yes
In ISI Web of Science:Yes
DOI :10.1038/s41598-018-29358-x
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2045-2322
Status:Published
Keywords:chronic sleep deficiency, circadian disruption, aging, cognitive performance
HGF - Research field:Aeronautics, Space and Transport
HGF - Program:Aeronautics
HGF - Program Themes:air traffic management and operations
DLR - Research area:Aeronautics
DLR - Program:L AO - Air Traffic Management and Operation
DLR - Research theme (Project):L - Human factors and safety in Aeronautics
Location: Köln-Porz
Institutes and Institutions:Institute of Aerospace Medicine > Sleep and Human Factors Research
Deposited By: Meckes, Elke
Deposited On:23 Oct 2018 11:18
Last Modified:23 Oct 2018 11:18

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