elib
DLR-Header
DLR-Logo -> http://www.dlr.de
DLR Portal Home | Imprint | Privacy Policy | Contact | Deutsch
Fontsize: [-] Text [+]

Illumination conditions at the lunar poles: Implications for future exploration

Gläser, P. and Oberst, J. and Neumann, G.A. and Mazarico, E. and Speyerer, E. J. and Robinson, M.S. (2017) Illumination conditions at the lunar poles: Implications for future exploration. Planetary and Space Science. Elsevier. DOI: 10.1016/j.pss.2017.07.006 ISSN 0032-0633

Full text not available from this repository.

Official URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0032063317300478

Abstract

We produced 400 × 400 km Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) of the lunar poles from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) ranging measurements. To achieve consistent, high-resolution DTMs of 20 m/pixel the individual ranging profiles were adjusted to remove small track-to-track offsets. We used these LOLA-DTMs to simulate illumination conditions at surface level for 50 × 50 km regions centered on the poles. Illumination was derived in one-hour increments from 01 January, 2017 to 01 January, 2037 to cover the lunar precessional cycle of 18.6 years and to determine illumination conditions over several future mission cycles. We identified three regions receiving high levels of illumination at each pole, e.g. the equator-facing crater rims of Hinshelwood, Peary and Whipple for the north pole and the rim of Shackleton crater, and two locations on a ridge between Shackleton and de Gerlache crater for the south pole. Their average illumination levels range from 69.5% to 82.9%, with the highest illumination levels found at the north pole on the rim of Whipple crater. A more detailed study was carried out for these sites as targets for a lander and/or rover equipped with solar arrays. For this purpose we assumed a lander with a structural height of two meters above the ground (height of the solar panels). Here average illumination levels range from 77.1% to 88.0%, with the maximum found at the ridge between Shackleton and de Gerlache crater on the south pole. Distances, sizes and slopes of nearby Permanently Shadowed Regions (PSRs) as a prime science target were also assessed in this case.

Item URL in elib:https://elib.dlr.de/119091/
Document Type:Article
Title:Illumination conditions at the lunar poles: Implications for future exploration
Authors:
AuthorsInstitution or Email of AuthorsAuthors ORCID iD
Gläser, P.Technical University Berlin, Institute for Geodesy and Geoinformation Sciences, BerlinUNSPECIFIED
Oberst, J.Juergen.Oberst (at) dlr.deUNSPECIFIED
Neumann, G.A.NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771UNSPECIFIED
Mazarico, E.NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USAUNSPECIFIED
Speyerer, E. J.School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USAUNSPECIFIED
Robinson, M.S.School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287UNSPECIFIED
Date:15 July 2017
Journal or Publication Title:Planetary and Space Science
Refereed publication:Yes
Open Access:No
Gold Open Access:No
In SCOPUS:Yes
In ISI Web of Science:Yes
DOI :10.1016/j.pss.2017.07.006
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0032-0633
Status:Published
Keywords:Polar illumination, Moon, Landing sites, Space exploration, LOLA
HGF - Research field:Aeronautics, Space and Transport
HGF - Program:Space
HGF - Program Themes:Space Science and Exploration
DLR - Research area:Raumfahrt
DLR - Program:R EW - Erforschung des Weltraums
DLR - Research theme (Project):R - Vorhaben Exploration des Sonnensystems
Location: Berlin-Adlershof
Institutes and Institutions:Institute of Planetary Research > Planetary Geodesy
Deposited By: Wählisch, Marita
Deposited On:19 Mar 2018 11:02
Last Modified:19 Mar 2018 11:02

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Browse
Search
Help & Contact
Information
electronic library is running on EPrints 3.3.12
Copyright © 2008-2017 German Aerospace Center (DLR). All rights reserved.