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An international collaboration studying the physiological and anatomical cerebral effects of carbon dioxide during head-down tilt bed rest: The SPACECOT study

Marshall-Goebel, K. and Mulder, E. and Donoviel, D. and Strangman, G and Suarez, J.I. and Venkatasubba Rao, C. and Frings-Meuthen, P. and Limper, Ulrich and Rittweger, Jörn and Bershad, E. M. (2017) An international collaboration studying the physiological and anatomical cerebral effects of carbon dioxide during head-down tilt bed rest: The SPACECOT study. Journal of Applied Physiology, 22 (6), pp. 1398-1405. American Physiological Society. DOI: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00885.2016 ISSN 8750-7587

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Abstract

Exposure to the microgravity environment results in various adaptive and maladaptive physiological changes in the human body, with notable ophthalmic abnormalities developing during 6-mo missions on the International Space Station (ISS). These findings have led to the hypothesis that the loss of gravity induces a cephalad fluid shift, decreased cerebral venous outflow, and increased intracranial pressure, which may be further exacerbated by increased ambient carbon dioxide (CO2) levels on the ISS. Here we describe the SPACECOT study (studying the physiological and anatomical cerebral effects of CO2 during head-down tilt), a randomized, double-blind crossover design study with two conditions: 29 h of 12° head-down tilt (HDT) with ambient air and 29 h of 12° HDT with 0.5% CO2 The internationally collaborative SPACECOT study utilized an innovative approach to study the effects of headward fluid shifting induced by 12° HDT and increased ambient CO2 as well as their interaction with a focus on cerebral and ocular anatomy and physiology. Here we provide an in-depth overview of this new approach including the subjects, study design, and implementation, as well as the standardization plan for nutritional intake, environmental parameters, and bed rest procedures. NEW & NOTEWORTHY A new approach for investigating the combined effects of cephalad fluid shifting and increased ambient carbon dioxide (CO2) is presented. This may be useful for studying the neuroophthalmic and cerebral effects of spaceflight where cephalad fluid shifts occur in an elevated CO2 environment

Item URL in elib:https://elib.dlr.de/113053/
Document Type:Article
Title:An international collaboration studying the physiological and anatomical cerebral effects of carbon dioxide during head-down tilt bed rest: The SPACECOT study
Authors:
AuthorsInstitution or Email of AuthorsAuthors ORCID iD
Marshall-Goebel, K.german aerospace center (dlr)https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5240-7625
Mulder, E.german aerospace center (dlr), institute of aerospace medicine, space physiology, cologne, germanyUNSPECIFIED
Donoviel, D.baylor college of medicineUNSPECIFIED
Strangman, GMassachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School Charlestown, MassachusettsUNSPECIFIED
Suarez, J.I.Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TexasUNSPECIFIED
Venkatasubba Rao, C.Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TexasUNSPECIFIED
Frings-Meuthen, P.german aerospace center (dlr), institute of aerospace medicine, space physiology, cologne, germanyUNSPECIFIED
Limper, UlrichUlrich.Limper (at) dlr.dehttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-9927-4180
Rittweger, JörnJoern.Rittweger (at) dlr.dehttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-2223-8963
Bershad, E. M.baylor college of medicineUNSPECIFIED
Date:1 June 2017
Journal or Publication Title:Journal of Applied Physiology
Refereed publication:Yes
Open Access:No
Gold Open Access:No
In SCOPUS:Yes
In ISI Web of Science:Yes
Volume:22
DOI :10.1152/japplphysiol.00885.2016
Page Range:pp. 1398-1405
Publisher:American Physiological Society
ISSN:8750-7587
Status:Published
Keywords:analog; intracranial pressure; microgravity; spaceflight; visual impairment
HGF - Research field:Aeronautics, Space and Transport
HGF - Program:Space
HGF - Program Themes:Research under Space Conditions
DLR - Research area:Raumfahrt
DLR - Program:R FR - Forschung unter Weltraumbedingungen
DLR - Research theme (Project):R - Vorhaben Systemphysiologie
Location: Köln-Porz
Institutes and Institutions:Institute of Aerospace Medicine > Space Physiology
Deposited By: Becker, Christine
Deposited On:04 Jul 2017 12:32
Last Modified:06 Sep 2019 15:27

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