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Antibacterial Activity of Blue Light against Nosocomial Wound Pathogens Growing Planktonically and as Mature Biofilms

Halstead, Fenella D. and Thwaite, Joanne E. and Burt, Rebecca and Laws, Thomas R. and Raguse, Marina and Moeller, Ralf and Webber, Mark A. and Oppenheim, Beryl A. (2016) Antibacterial Activity of Blue Light against Nosocomial Wound Pathogens Growing Planktonically and as Mature Biofilms. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 82 (13), pp. 4006-4016. American Society for Microbiology. DOI: 10.1128/AEM.00756-16 ISSN 0099-2240

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.00756-16

Abstract

The blue wavelengths within the visible light spectrum are intrinisically antimicrobial and can photodynamically inactivate the cells of a wide spectrum of bacteria (Gram positive and negative) and fungi. Furthermore, blue light is equally effective against both drug-sensitive and -resistant members of target species and is less detrimental to mammalian cells than is UV radiation. Blue light is currently used for treating acnes vulgaris and Helicobacter pylori infections; the utility for decontamination and treatment of wound infections is in its infancy. Furthermore, limited studies have been performed on bacterial biofilms, the key growth mode of bacteria involved in clinical infections. Here we report the findings of a multicenter in vitro study performed to assess the antimicrobial activity of 400-nm blue light against bacteria in both planktonic and biofilm growth modes. Blue light was tested against a panel of 34 bacterial isolates (clinical and type strains) comprising Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterobacter cloacae, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Elizabethkingia meningoseptica. All planktonic-phase bacteria were susceptible to blue light treatment, with the majority (71%) demonstrating a≥5-log₁₀ decrease in viability after 15 to 30 min of exposure (54 J/cm² to 108 J/cm²). Bacterial biofilms were also highly susceptible to blue light, with significant reduction in seeding observed for all isolates at all levels of exposure. These results warrant further investigation of blue light as a novel decontamination strategy for the nosocomial environment, as well as additional wider decontamination applications.

Item URL in elib:https://elib.dlr.de/104908/
Document Type:Article
Title:Antibacterial Activity of Blue Light against Nosocomial Wound Pathogens Growing Planktonically and as Mature Biofilms
Authors:
AuthorsInstitution or Email of AuthorsAuthors ORCID iD
Halstead, Fenella D.Clinical Microbiology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK and NIHR Surgical Reconstruction and Microbiology Research Centre, QEH and Institute of Microbiology and Infection, Univ. of BirminghamUNSPECIFIED
Thwaite, Joanne E.Chemical, Biological and Radiological Division, Dstl, Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire, United KingdomUNSPECIFIED
Burt, RebeccaClinical Microbiology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom and Institute of Microbiology and Infection, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United KingdomUNSPECIFIED
Laws, Thomas R.Chemical, Biological and Radiological Division, Dstl, Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire, United KingdomUNSPECIFIED
Raguse, MarinaGerman Aerospace Center (DLRe.V.), Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Radiation Biology Department, Space Microbiology Research Group, Cologne, GermanyUNSPECIFIED
Moeller, RalfGerman Aerospace Center (DLRe.V.), Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Radiation Biology Department, Space Microbiology Research Group, Cologne, GermanyUNSPECIFIED
Webber, Mark A.NIHR Surgical Reconstruction and Microbiology Research Centre, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom and Institute of Microbiology and Infection, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United KingdomUNSPECIFIED
Oppenheim, Beryl A.Clinical Microbiology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom and NIHR Surgical Reconstruction and Microbiology Research Centre, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, United KingdomUNSPECIFIED
Date:2016
Journal or Publication Title:Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Refereed publication:Yes
Open Access:Yes
Gold Open Access:No
In SCOPUS:Yes
In ISI Web of Science:Yes
Volume:82
DOI :10.1128/AEM.00756-16
Page Range:pp. 4006-4016
Publisher:American Society for Microbiology
ISSN:0099-2240
Status:Published
Keywords:blue light, antimicrobial activity, bacteria in planktonic and biofilm growth modes, nosocomial environment, decontamination applications
HGF - Research field:Aeronautics, Space and Transport
HGF - Program:Space
HGF - Program Themes:Research under Space Conditions
DLR - Research area:Raumfahrt
DLR - Program:R FR - Forschung unter Weltraumbedingungen
DLR - Research theme (Project):R - Vorhaben Strahlenbiologie
Location: Köln-Porz
Institutes and Institutions:Institute of Aerospace Medicine > Radiation Biology
Deposited By: Kopp, Kerstin
Deposited On:06 Jul 2016 10:31
Last Modified:31 Jul 2019 20:02

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