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On the Response of Halophilic Archaea to Space Conditions

Leuko, Stefan and Rettberg, Petra and Pontifex, Ashleigh L. and Burns, Brendan P. (2014) On the Response of Halophilic Archaea to Space Conditions. Life, 4 (1), pp. 66-76. MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland. DOI: 10.3390/life4010066. ISSN 2075-1729.

Full text not available from this repository.

Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/life4010066

Abstract

Microorganisms are ubiquitous and can be found in almost every habitat and ecological niche on Earth. They thrive and survive in a broad spectrum of environments and adapt to rapidly changing external conditions. It is of great interest to investigate how microbes adapt to different extreme environments and with modern human space travel, we added a new extreme environment: outer space. Within the last 50 years, technology has provided tools for transporting microbial life beyond Earth’s protective shield in order to study in situ responses to selected conditions of space. This review will focus on halophilic archaea, as, due to their ability to survive in extremes, they are often considered a model group of organisms to study responses to the harsh conditions associated with space. We discuss ground-based simulations, as well as space experiments, utilizing archaea, examining responses and/or resistance to the effects of microgravity and UV in particular. Several halophilic archaea (e.g., Halorubrum chaoviator) have been exposed to simulated and actual space conditions and their survival has been determined as well as the protective effects of halite shown. Finally, the intriguing potential of archaea to survive on other planets or embedded in a meteorite is postulated.

Document Type:Article
Title:On the Response of Halophilic Archaea to Space Conditions
Authors:
AuthorsInstitution or Email of Authors
Leuko, StefanDeutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut für Luft- und Raumfahrtmedizin, Abteilung Strahlenbiologie, Arbeitsgruppe Astrobiologie, Linder Höhe, Köln 51147, Germany; E-Mail: stefan.Leuko@dlr.de (S.L.)
Rettberg, PetraDeutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut für Luft- und Raumfahrtmedizin, Abteilung Strahlenbiologie, Arbeitsgruppe Astrobiologie, Linder Höhe, Köln 51147, Germany; E-Mail: petra.rettberg@dlr.de (P.R.)
Pontifex, Ashleigh L.School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia and Australian Centre for Astrobiology, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia; E-Mail: a.pontifex@student.unsw.edu.au
Burns, Brendan P.School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia; and Australian Centre for Astrobiology, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia; E-Mail: brendan.burns@unsw.edu.au;
Date:2014
Journal or Publication Title:Life
Refereed publication:Yes
In Open Access:Yes
In SCOPUS:No
In ISI Web of Science:No
Volume:4
DOI:10.3390/life4010066
Page Range:pp. 66-76
Publisher:MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland
ISSN:2075-1729
Status:Published
Keywords:halophilic archaea, space conditions, UV
HGF - Research field:Aeronautics, Space and Transport
HGF - Program:Space
HGF - Program Themes:Research under Space Conditions
DLR - Research area:Raumfahrt
DLR - Program:R FR - Forschung unter Weltraumbedingungen
DLR - Research theme (Project):R - Vorhaben Strahlenbiologie
Location: Köln-Porz
Institutes and Institutions:Institute of Aerospace Medicine > Radiation Biology
Deposited By: Kerstin Kopp
Deposited On:26 Feb 2014 13:53
Last Modified:26 Feb 2014 13:53

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