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Magnetic field fossilization and tail reconfiguration in Titan's plasma environment during a magnetopause passage: 3D adaptive hybrid code simulations

Müller, J. and Simon, S. and Motschmann, U. and Glassmeier, K.-H. and Sauer, J. and Schüle, J. and Pringle, G. J. (2010) Magnetic field fossilization and tail reconfiguration in Titan's plasma environment during a magnetopause passage: 3D adaptive hybrid code simulations. Planetary and Space Science, 58 (12), pp. 1526-1546. Elsevier. DOI: DOI: 10.1016/j.pss.2010.07.018.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

We present a hybrid simulation study (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) of Titan's plasma interaction during an excursion of this moon from Saturn's magnetosphere into its magnetosheath, as observed for the first time during Cassini's T32 flyby on 13 June 2007. In contrast to earlier simulations of Titan's plasma environment under non-stationary upstream conditions, our model considers a difference in the flow directions of magnetospheric and magnetosheath plasma. Two complementary scenarios are investigated, with the flow directions of the impinging magnetospheric/magnetosheath plasmas being (A) antiparallel and (B) parallel. In both cases, our simulations show that due to the drastically reduced convection speed in the slow and dense heavy ion plasma near Titan, the satellite carries a bundle of “fossilized” magnetic field lines from the magnetosphere in the magnetosheath. Furthermore, the passage through Saturn's magnetopause goes along with a disruption of Titan's pick-up tail. Although the tail is not detached from the satellite, large clouds of heavy ion plasma are stripped of its outer flank, featuring a wave-like pattern. Whereas in case (B) under parallel flow conditions there is only a small retardation of about 5 min between the passage of Titan through the magnetopause and the reconfiguration of the pick-up tail, the tail reconfiguration in the case (A) scenario is completed not until 25 min after the magnetopause passage. The lifetime of fossil fields in the moon's ionosphere is approximately 25 min, regardless of whether parallel or antiparallel flow conditions are applied.

Document Type:Article
Title:Magnetic field fossilization and tail reconfiguration in Titan's plasma environment during a magnetopause passage: 3D adaptive hybrid code simulations
Authors:
AuthorsInstitution or Email of Authors
Müller, J.Institute for theoretical Physics, TU Braunschweig, Germany
Simon, S.Institut of Geophysics and Meteorology, University of colongne, Germany
Motschmann, U.Institute for theoretical Physics, TU Braunschweig, Germany
Glassmeier, K.-H.Institute for Geophysics and Extraterrestrial Physics, TU Braunschschweig, Germany
Sauer, J. Institut of Geophysics and Meteorology, University of colongne, Germany
Schüle, J.Gauss-IT-Centre, TU Braunschweig, Germany
Pringle, G. J. EPCC, University of Edinburgh, UK
Date:2010
Journal or Publication Title:Planetary and Space Science
Refereed publication:Yes
In Open Access:No
In SCOPUS:Yes
In ISI Web of Science:Yes
Volume:58
DOI:DOI: 10.1016/j.pss.2010.07.018
Page Range:pp. 1526-1546
Publisher:Elsevier
Series Name:Elsevier
Status:Published
Keywords:Titan, Fossil magnetic fields, Plasma interactions with unmagnetized, bodies, Cassini, Real-time simulations
HGF - Research field:Aeronautics, Space and Transport (old)
HGF - Program:Space (old)
HGF - Program Themes:W EW - Erforschung des Weltraums
DLR - Research area:Space
DLR - Program:W EW - Erforschung des Weltraums
DLR - Research theme (Project):W - Vorhaben Asteroiden und Kometen (old)
Location: Berlin-Adlershof
Institutes and Institutions:Institute of Planetary Research > Asteroids and Comets
Deposited By: Laura-Maria Brumm
Deposited On:14 Jan 2011 14:56
Last Modified:26 Mar 2013 13:26

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