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Global impact of road traffic emissions on tropospheric ozone

Matthes, S. and Grewe, V. and Sausen, R. and Roelofs, G.-J. (2007) Global impact of road traffic emissions on tropospheric ozone. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 7, pp. 1707-1718.

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Official URL: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/7/1707/2007/

Abstract

Road traffic is one of the major anthropogenic emission sectors for NOx, CO and NMHCs (non-methane hydrocarbons). We applied ECHAM4/CBM, a general circulation model coupled to a chemistry module, which includes higher hydrocarbons, to investigate the global impact of 1990 road traffic emissions on the atmosphere. Improving over previous global modelling studies, which concentrated on road traffic NOx and CO emissions only, we assess the impact of NMHC emissions from road traffic. It is revealed that NMHC emissions from road traffic play a key role for the impact on ozone. They are responsible for (indirect) long-range transport of NOx from road traffic via the formation of PAN, which is not found in a simulation without NMHC emissions from road traffic. Long-range transport of NMHC-induced PAN impacts on the ozone distribution in Northern Hemisphere regions far away from the sources, especially in arctic and remote maritime regions. In July total road traffic emissions (NOx, CO and NMHCs) contribute to the zonally averaged ozone distribution by more than 12% near the surface in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes and arctic latitudes. In January road traffic emissions contribute near the surface in northern and southern extratropics more than 8%. Sensitivity studies for regional emission show that effective transport of road traffic emissions occurs mainly in the free troposphere. In tropical latitudes of America up to an altitude of 200 hPa, global road traffic emissions contribute about 8% to the ozone concentration. In arctic latitudes NMHC emissions from road transport are responsible for about 90% of PAN increase from road transport, leading to a contribution to ozone concentrations of up to 15%.

Document Type:Article
Title:Global impact of road traffic emissions on tropospheric ozone
Authors:
AuthorsInstitution or Email of Authors
Matthes, S.UNSPECIFIED
Grewe, V.UNSPECIFIED
Sausen, R.UNSPECIFIED
Roelofs, G.-J.Univ. of Utrecht, Utrecht, NL
Date:2007
Journal or Publication Title:Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Volume:7
Page Range:pp. 1707-1718
Status:Published
Keywords:Verkehr, Troposphäre, Chemie der Atmosphäre, Emissionen, NOx, CO, NMHC
HGF - Research field:Aeronautics, Space and Transport
HGF - Program:Aeronautics
HGF - Program Themes:L VU - Air Traffic and Environment (old)
DLR - Research area:Aeronautics
DLR - Program:L VU - Air Traffic and Environment
DLR - Research theme (Project):L - Low-Emission Air Traffic (old)
Location: Oberpfaffenhofen
Institutes and Institutions:Institute of Atmospheric Physics > Atmospheric Dynamics
Deposited By: Jana Freund
Deposited On:16 Apr 2007
Last Modified:12 Dec 2013 20:23

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